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curmdgeon.GIF (1254 bytes) Curmudgeons' Corner

A nameless guestmudgeon gets down on...

I have to say that the most aggravating thing I have heard is the misuse of get off, get out, and get down when referring to exiting a vehicle.  It is my understanding that one "gets off" a major or large form of transportation, such as getting off the plane, or getting off the bus. It aggravates me to no end to hear "get down from the car" or "getting off the car". Wouldn't that imply that the passenger is on top of the car rather than in it?

We agree with your general assessment of correct usage in these instances, but "getting off" and "getting down from" a car may be dialectical usages that refer back to a time when one would "get off" or "get down from" a horse-drawn cart or the like.  It's difficult to say for certain.

Have you heard or read similar or equally distressing usages?

Do tell us. 

Read this before commenting on this week's Curmudgeons' Corner

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